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The_Warblers

Classic paper books - Time to retire?

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Coming from a home that treasures books, my dad has filled the downstairs with 5 bookcases of 90% books in Arabic (while my sisters and I can read Arabic, somewhat, but we do not have enough vocabulary to read these important religious texts) and my mom has flooded the upstairs with bookcases & milk-crate book nooks with teaching & "classic" type books, I think it's safe to say that books are a staple to my family that we all will carry with us wherever we end up. Like Musical_Shoyruflpatsfan, and PaintBrushedDreams, I find a Kindle helpful & technology helps (I'd rather call up evidence/ a file on a laptop then have to plow through index cards in a 'file box' for Debate like my mom told me they did in the 80's), but I will always want to have a book to read and re-read. 

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Do you guys feel the sale of books might start to increase again now, now that the shiny has worn off the ebook technology? Much like vinyl record sales are increasing and downloads diminishing?

 

I've just re-read my 2 posts on the previous page and I still hold by what I said then, 100%. If I won a load of money (and there's a chance I might do, I have premium bonds which MIGHT net me a million one day! But more likely just another £25 every now and again. >_<) I'd still get my junk-filled dining room turned into a library. <3

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4 hours ago, jellysundae said:

Do you guys feel the sale of books might start to increase again now, now that the shiny has worn off the ebook technology? Much like vinyl record sales are increasing and downloads diminishing?

You got it on the nose! I work for Indigo Books & Music up in Canada so not only do I absolutely love reading but I also take a large fascination in how the company is doing. Ebooks sales have indeed decreased within the last year and paper sales have gone up, continuing the trend that colouring books booted two/three years ago. I think paper sales are going to continue to grow in the next couple of years for a few reasons. One being almost every movie trailer I see is based on a novel and that definitely gets a lot of people interested. Another is that a lot of youtubers, comedians, and other multi-media stars are writing biographies/humour books/teen entertainment books  and etc which bring in more people that wouldn't typically pick up a book. I'm not too sure how 5 years down the road will look like, though I'm really curious, but I don't think paper books will ever become obsolete. 

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I'm just grateful for the upswing at the moment. I'm positively thrilled that younger people aren't totally shunning books, and there's totally room for both paper and ebooks to exist side-by-side and both make a profit.

Another area where the internet is spawning books is food bloggers bringing out recipe books, there's LOADS of those coming out!

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I love the smell and the texture of paper books. I have memories tied to particular book smells. And, I can't really explain why, but I just generally get more captivated by a paper book. If I'm looking to clear my head and get away from things, a paper book is the way to go. But, as far a the e-books, I love being able to travel with all my favorites. It's convenient for sure. 

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I have a Kindle and I read on it. I will always prefer paperback books though especially if it's a nice day outside and I can read on the front porch. 

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I doubt paper books will ever be retired.  Too many people enjoy reading regular books (myself included).  

Also, about the environmentally friendly thing: I know it's bad to cut down trees and kill plants and all, but did you know that 75% of the world's oxygen comes from algae?  Even if all plants died, we would probably still be able to survive if we kept our water clean.  I don't think we should cut down all the trees, but it's not bad for the environment to cut down a few trees to make a few books.

On 2/19/2017 at 4:11 PM, midnight_spell360 said:

Coming from a home that treasures books, my dad has filled the downstairs with 5 bookcases of 90% books in Arabic (while my sisters and I can read Arabic, somewhat, but we do not have enough vocabulary to read these important religious texts) and my mom has flooded the upstairs with bookcases & milk-crate book nooks with teaching & "classic" type books, I think it's safe to say that books are a staple to my family that we all will carry with us wherever we end up. Like Musical_Shoyruflpatsfan, and PaintBrushedDreams, I find a Kindle helpful & technology helps (I'd rather call up evidence/ a file on a laptop then have to plow through index cards in a 'file box' for Debate like my mom told me they did in the 80's), but I will always want to have a book to read and re-read. 

While we don't have 5 bookcases full of books in Arabic (hmm, maybe time to start learning), my family is much the same.  We do use e-readers and such, especially for traveling, which we do a lot, but we have at least 20 bookcases' worth of books :dance:  I love it, especially the antique books we have, and it's always nice to sit down with a cup of coffee, sit out in the sunshine, or curl up by the fireplace with a real paper book in your hands.  I can never get over that amazing feeling you get when you read a book.  (I might be a tad obsessed. :P)

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6 hours ago, Robin-chan said:

Plus, they don't require electricity! 

THIS!!!

I have BIG issues with technology that replaces something that lasts for years and works for free, with something that costs you money for the rest of its life, its SHORT life because of planned obsolescence... *grouches*

I'm currently re-reading Arthur Ransom's Secret Water. A somewhat battered hardback printed in 1957 that's been in my possession since 1981 when it was withdrawn for sale from my school library and I bought it for the princely sum of 10p. It's got the most DELICIOUS old book smell, you don't get THAT from a Kindle, lol.

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Yeah, I love paper books.  I have a kindle, and I use it like a library somewhat, to supplement my paper books with free kindle books, because I can read several books a day.  But, I would never buy a kindle edition rather than a paperback (or a digital copy of a movie instead of a DVD).  For one thing, I like to physically own stuff.  With digital copies, you just buy the right to read/watch it.  They could, theoretically cut off your access at some point.  Or, there are compatibility issues with competing services.  Or, society and infrastructure as we know it could collapse and you would no longer have access to internet and your digital copies of things.  Or just power going out.  If that happens, I have about 400 books in my room to keep me occupied (and battery powered lanterns).  I love when libraries have book sales, and you can get books for like 10 cents each.

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I always read paper books when available. The gentle crunch of a page flips feels so satisfying, plus it brings about the nostalgia of pleasant childhood afternoons. It also adds an extra something that reading online books or pdfs lacks - when I read I imagine myself as part of the book's separate universe, and being on an online device with access to the internet and billions of other people takes away from that magical feeling. I almost always ask for used books for presents. They're terrifically cheap at library sales or on thriftbooks, plus I feel personal gratification at the thought that somebody before me enjoyed the same story, and that I (and others) will continue to derive happiness from that story. I mean, everyone can enjoy the same story online too, but the history of a paper book is more personal. Maybe it was a cherished bedtime story, maybe it was a birthday gift from a beloved relative, or passed down from parent to child. It's harder to attach memories to an online version.

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I like paper books. They just feel more engaging. I think there's less distractions when you're on a book. Plus, I spend a good amount of my free time on a laptop. If I read digital books, that would mean more time sitting at a desk, rather than relaxing outside, book in hand (I mean I guess you could bring your device outside but you'll have to watch your battery), drink next to me. Until the mosquitoes arrive, at least. 
They say screens for long periods of time are bad for your eyes. I agree. Not that they damage your eyes, because I don't know, but screens don't leave me feeling as relaxed as other activities do. I also consider it a form of merch. Harry Potter books? Check. Digital Harry Potter files? eh...

I like to read before bed. People also say that staring at a screen right before bed is bad, too, and I must say I agree. I'll get sleepy when reading a book, but if I'm on my phone eventually I'll have to tell myself 'enough is enough' and make myself sleep. 

My favorite part? Books have infinite battery life. And I love how you can make cute little bookmarks and book jackets (I have one where it looks like a monster is eating the corner of the page) and that physical reminder of how far along you are. Not just "page 394 out of 500", but you can see that you're already 9 3/4 of the way through the book. Oh, and I like to order my books online from a discount website, and I love getting things in the mail, so it works out. My favorite part is somewhat forgetting I have something on the way, and receiving it, like a present. And I don't know how much digital files cost, but books are free from the library. Just don't lose them. 

You don't get older people rolling their eyes or making comments about your obsession with your device, either. You can read a physical book for hours and nobody says anything. They might call you smart, if anything. If it's on a device, it's different. Nobody cares if you're reading a book, they just want to judge. 

Also, another thing. Whenever a train goes past my house, it causes the internet to go out. I know. So annoying. So having a book nearby makes it nice. Digital books could help here, too. 

And there is no way I would ever do this, even if the situation required it, but you could use them as emergency fire starters. I just got "Fahrenheit 451" and this idea makes me laugh. 

They won't disappear after you read them, either ;)

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